The danger topic

That is at the centre for me today. I have had a little dry spell, for some reason; I could not get the words coming from my fingers in a balanced way. Not sure if it was the news, or if it was the lack of news. Even as we are slowly strolling to new escalations when Israel was going after Hezbollah and got a free upgrade to a dead Iranian General. Just as I am still not convinced it was North Korea to begin with (that Sony event). We see additional escalations, escalations that are moving the prying eyes away from many small fields that are now on the verge of making rather large changes to all of us.

First there is Greece, we see an escalation of more and more ‘giving in’, all these professors, all about forgiving debt. Yet, when will we see the Greek officials in prison? When will we see ACTUAL prosecution of corruption? It is like a group of people, who keep on feeding the junk money for the train home, knowing it is spend on drugs, booze and perhaps a few hookers (I mean ladies with flexible morals). When we consider the Guardian (at http://www.theguardian.com/business/2015/jan/21/eurozone-exit-greek-grexit-germany-france), it seems to me that some statements like “Today a Grexit would weaken German and French banks, and cost the German government up to €77bn and the International Monetary Fund a slug of its loans, but would be unlikely to frighten global markets or undermine the 14-year-old currency bloc“, as well as “The Bruegal Institute in Brussels is not the only think-tank to believe the estimated €250bn cost of a Grexit, while covered by the bailout funds, would cripple the Eurozone and delay recovery for a decade“, give the taste that people need to avoid the Greek exit, but is that not at the foundation of the junk needing a fix? Those in power desperately want to stay in power. I am not talking about Greek politics, they want to skate on emotion and fairness, whilst not prosecuting, or holding to account those who were responsible for the current situation and it is about to get decently worse. You see, as America is close to hitting another debt ceiling, we will either see the raising of debt, or a reshuffle of numbers so that the debt will ‘conveniently’ seem like less. It is not just America, even though 18 trillion takes the cake and the icing. We need to look with the harsh light at the decisions the Europeans (through Italy) are now showing a new race. At The Bruegal Institute in Brussels is not the only think-tank to believe the estimated €250bn cost of a Grexit, while covered by the bailout funds, would cripple the Eurozone and delay recovery for a decade we now see that the ECB is about to spend 1.1 trillion for bonds. When we see “The Frankfurt-based bank will use electronically created money to buy the bonds of Eurozone governments – quantitative easing – to try to boost confidence, push up inflation and drive down the value of the single currency, helping to increase exports and kick-start growth“, can we agree that when an economy needs a trillion dollar kick-start, that the patient is not sick, it died and it is not going to live long, no matter how much money you pump into its cadaver shaped foundation. You see, we all need a little boost every now and then, but 1 trillion is not a little boost, it is the setting of a massive debt, whilst getting the continued revenue for those who are already well beyond rich. The last is not entirely fair or correct, but consider these statements we see all over the place that the richest 1% will own well over 50% of the planet by 2016. Yet we need to pump more virtual cash on the population? This is not just the continuation of a bad idea, it seems that the bulk of the governments are not holding themselves or others to account. So as we see “Today the ECB has finally arrived as a truly ‘European’ Central Bank. It has acted against political opposition to deliver what is by most measures an ambitious programme of quantitative easing,” he said. “The ECB has finally, if belatedly, done its part. Now it’s time for the Eurozone to relax the fiscal constraint“, we also see the dangers that the debt will change the curve of debt release for a lot longer, whilst the taxpayer deals with the debt of ‘spending’ now, the people will not see true new jobs,  or longer term employment. So how is this ‘easing’ a good thing for anything else than the non-accountability of the governments connected? This gets me to the second part, some state that it is fiscal constraint, can in equal measure not be stated that this is for temporary fictive fiscal restraint? It is just a point of view. If we see Fiscal constraint as: ‘a reasonable comparison of planned expenditures to expected revenues‘ and Fiscal restraint as ‘Fiscal restraint is used to reduce inflationary pressures. The strategy is to shift the aggregate demand curve to the left with budget cuts or tax hikes‘. So as we see the mention “push up inflation and drive down the value of the single currency“, why was the mention Fiscal constraint and not ‘fiscal restraint’? Perhaps it is as easy as two sides of the same coin, but the guardian does not elaborate on both sides at all. This might have a valid reason, but should the audience not get a ‘better’ picture, especially as an additional trillion in fictive currency gets added to the market. This all calls into additional account the Swiss actions of last week, perhaps they saw what was likely to happen and they are very concerned for the consequences of these implementations. In addition, the acts of the usually ‘extremus sobrium’ Swiss should pause us to question a few matters.

Now I am not talking some conspiracy theory, but the fact that we usually get confronted with some high end decision and we the people are left with the invoice, should the papers at large not educate us? And with that I mean educate us a lot further beyond the ‘column’ and a copy and paste part? Again the last part is not fair and not correct, but the information part is massively missing. Again, me is not of being an economist (bad grammar intentional), but that I share with a massive part of the audience of those reading a newspaper.

So now we get to the part of German Chancellor Merkel (at http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/jan/22/angela-merkel-greece-debts-german-world-economic-forum-davos), I wholeheartedly agree with the quote “it must take responsibility for its debts, as the country heads into crunch elections that could reignite the Eurozone debt crisis“, we gave support again and again (in the way of extra funds), whilst again and again we see the Greek demand to be held non-accountable for it all. We see the need for the Greeks to renegotiate their loans, and payments, whilst striking with the decent regularity of someone getting new clothes. Now, I am not having a go at the Greek population, they have been handed a raw deal, but let us not forget, this raw deal was given to them by their ‘fellow’ Greeks. So, it seems that the anger at others is a simple variation of the blame game. It is an understandable one, but still not the correct actions as I personally see it.

So as we move towards whatever option we could get to, the ‘notion’ of a World Bank Chief making a climate action plea, is not a bad one, but fixing the economy before spending a ton on infrastructure, a massive amount that is not bringing Europeans any ‘debt relief’ seems a little beyond proportions. It is almost like reading on how we need new trousers, whilst the bank has cancelled all our bank cards and our pockets are empty. This is not an exaggerated example. The debts in Europe are for a significant side way beyond proportions.

Consider the following quotes: “Tsipras wants Athens to be forgiven some debts to cut the cost of repayments. This would allow Greece a partial default while staying inside the euro. Brussels has said this is naive politics, if only because Ireland and Portugal, which also have mountainous debts with the EU, would ask for the same” and “Zsolt Darvas, one of the institute’s economists said: “I am convinced that Greece will need new funding from European partners, but its volume should be a few dozen billion euros, say €20bn-€30bn

So not only are the Greek introduced to more stories by ‘Mother Goose’ Tsipras and in addition they will need another infusion of a few dozen billions. So, that comes to well over $2000 for every Greek. What is this money used for? Paying debts? Paying more interest bills? The latter now shows the link between the richest 1% and their unequal growth. In my view it is the foundations and settings for legalising slave labour. How will the Greek population EVER get out of debt?

Which gets us to the final quotes from the Guardian: “A newly minted drachma would be low enough to attract holidaymakers, but without the investment in new hotels, the industry could barely cope. Likewise, investment in new industries would be unlikely unless Tsipras can honour his pledge to root out corruption, something that has eluded the right-wing New Democracy party“, the Greeks cannot rely on tourism as is, especially when they return on the Drachme and that will be valued at 35,000 Drachma to the Euro (just voicing a fictive exchange), and without removing the current implied levels of corruption there is no solution other than the fact that loads of these cash incentives will go towards those who need not benefit and the Greek population gets even less options.

So as we look at these dangers as it will hit Greece and the rest of Europe, one must wonder why these people remain on the spending horse knowing it has not made a decent difference and knowing that added debts will delay economic fortune for additional decades. How is this ever going to be a solution?

 

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One response to “The danger topic

  1. Pingback: Let it (or them) die! | Lawrence van Rijn - Law Lord to be

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